Complete Definition of "supersede"

English

Etymology
Latin super, over + sedere, to sit, via Middle French superseder, originally in the meaning "postpone, defer" (as Latin).
The meaning "to replace" is from 1642, probably by association with precede.
Original Latin sense: proelio supersedere statuit he decided to delay battle âÄĒ Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico, 2:8.

Verb
en-verb|supersedes|superseding|superseded

  1. transitive set aside|Set (something) aside.
  2. transitive Take the place of.

#: No one could supersede his sister.

  1. transitive displace|Displace in favour of another.

#: Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

Synonyms
sense|take the place of replace, supplant, usurp

See also
supercede i|common misspelling
supersedure

Translations
trans-top|Set aside
trans-mid
Portuguese: t|pt|sobrepor
trans-bottom

trans-top|Take the place of
trans-mid
Portuguese: t|pt|substituir
trans-bottom

trans-top|Displace in favour of another
trans-mid
Portuguese: t|pt|substituir
trans-bottom

et:supersede
fr:supersede
io:supersede
fi:supersede
te:supersede
vi:supersede

Revision and Credits for"supersede"
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