Complete Definition of "vitiate"

English

Etymology
From the past participle stem of Latin vitiare, from vitium �vice�.

Pronunciation
IPA|/'vɪ�ɪ�ɪt/

Transitive verb
rfc-trverb|Transitive verb
en-verb|vitiat|ing

  1. to spoil, make faulty; to reduce the value, quality, or effectiveness of something

#*1997: �Mr Rose,� says the Physician, �this man was brought to us from Russia. Precisely such a case of vitiated judgment as I describe at length in my Treatise on Madness. Mayhap you have read it?� � Andrew Miller, Ingenious Pain

  1. to debase or morally corrupt
  2. archaic to violate, to rape

#*1965: �Crush the cockatrice,� he groaned, from his death-cell. �I am dead in law� � but of the girl he denied that he had �attempted to vitiate her at Nine years old�; for �upon the word of a dying man, both her Eyes did see, and her Hands did act in all that was done�. � John Fowles, The Magus

  1. to make something ineffective, to invalidate

fa:vitiate
fr:vitiate
io:vitiate
te:vitiate
vi:vitiate
zh:vitiate

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